Assessment 1 Part 2 – HLTH1005 & UNDERSTANDING WELL-BEING AND MENTAL HEALTH
Task Description
Write a written response that discusses how trauma might influence two of the factors of the holistic model which contribute to an individual of well-being. These factors are: biological, social, psychological and spiritual.
Assessment Brief Rationale
This assessment will ensure that students can collaboratively identify and discuss holistic care and demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practices of trauma-informed practice.
Task Instructions Written response (750 words)
An essential aspect of trauma-informed practice recognises the prevalence and subsequent impact of traumatic life experiences on mental well-being, therefore healthcare settings need to be safe, inclusive environments that provide tolerance for diversity and compassion. Choose two of the factors from the holistic model above (biological, psychological, sociological or spiritual) and write a response on how the experience of trauma may impact these chosen factors that contribute to an individual’s well-being. Remember that ‘trauma’ can be defined under various classifications from a single instance or complex. The primary focus of this response should focus on the potential impact these adverse experiences can have on these chosen factors of the holistic model. To complete the written response, complete the below steps:
Assessment Brief
1. Choose two of the factors from the holistic model of care (biological, psychological, sociological or spiritual), and write a response on how the experience of trauma can impact these two factors of the model which contribute to an individual’s well-being.
2. Use at least 3 academic references to support your response.
3. Use APA 7 referencing style.
Resources
The following readings may be used for the completion of this assignment:
Alegría, M., NeMoyer, A., Falgàs Bagué, I., Wang, Y., & Alvarez, K. (2018). Social determinants of mental health: where we are and where we need to go. Current psychiatry reports, 20, 1-13.
Compton, M. T., & Shim, R. S. (2015). The social determinants of mental health. Focus, 13(4), 419-425.
Felitti, V. J., Anda, R. F., Nordenberg, D., Williamson, D. F., Spitz, A. M., Edwards, V., & Marks, J. S. (1998). Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The Adverse Childhood Experiences
Sweeney, A., Filson, B., Kennedy, A., Collinson, L., & Gillard, S. (2018). A paradigm shift: relationships in trauma-informed mental health services. BJPsych advances, 24(5), 319-333.
Van der Kolk, B. (2022). Posttraumatic stress disorder and the nature of trauma. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience.
Watters, E. R., & Martin, G. (2021). Health outcomes following childhood maltreatment: an examination of the biopsychosocial model. Journal of aging and health, 33(7-8), 596-606.

Referencing style
This assessment should adhere to all referencing and citation conventions stipulated in the APA referencing guide (7th ed.). Quoting is not appropriate in this assignment. Please refer to the following resources on how to apply the APA 7th referencing style.

Assessment Rubric

Trauma and Well-Being: A Biopsychosocial Perspective
Trauma can profoundly impact an individual’s well-being by influencing multiple dimensions of human functioning. According to the holistic model of health, well-being is determined by interrelated biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors (World Health Organization, 2022). Experiences of trauma disrupt the delicate balance across these domains and undermine an individual’s ability to thrive. In this response, I will discuss how trauma may influence the biological and psychological factors that contribute to well-being from a biopsychosocial perspective, using recent research to support my analysis.
Biological Effects of Trauma
Extensive research has demonstrated that trauma elicits physiological stress responses that can negatively impact long-term health and functioning (Van der Kolk, 2022). When faced with threat, the body automatically activates its stress response systems, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system (Watters & Martin, 2021). This initiates the release of stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline, preparing the body to “fight or flight.” However, for those who experience prolonged or repeated trauma without adequate support or resolution, these stress responses become chronically elevated and dysregulated. Over time, sustained biological stress takes a toll, increasing risks for health issues like cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and impaired immune function (Felitti et al., 1998). The body pays a heavy price for contending with trauma.
Psychological Impact of Trauma

Trauma also leaves deep psychological scars by disrupting normal cognitive and emotional development (Sweeney et al., 2018). Feelings of safety, trust, and control are shattered. Trauma survivors frequently struggle with post-traumatic stress symptoms like re-experiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal that interfere with daily life and relationships (Van der Kolk, 2022). Furthermore, trauma in childhood is linked to higher risks for mental health issues in adulthood like depression, anxiety, and substance abuse (Felitti et al., 1998). The psychological turmoil of trauma challenges coping and undermines well-being.
In summary, the biopsychosocial model provides a framework for understanding how trauma gets “under the skin” to influence health through both biological and psychological pathways (Watters & Martin, 2021). By dysregulating stress response systems and disrupting cognitive-emotional development, trauma compromises well-being across multiple levels of human experience. Adopting a holistic, biopsychosocial lens is crucial for delivering trauma-informed care that addresses people’s needs in a comprehensive manner.
References

Felitti, V. J., Anda, R. F., Nordenberg, D., Williamson, D. F., Spitz, A. M., Edwards, V., & Marks, J. S. (1998). Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. American journal of preventive medicine, 14(4), 245-258.
Sweeney, A., Filson, B., Kennedy, A., Collinson, L., & Gillard, S. (2018). A paradigm shift: relationships in trauma-informed mental health services. BJPsych advances, 24(5), 319-333.
Van der Kolk, B. (2022). Posttraumatic stress disorder and the nature of trauma. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 24(1), 7-20.
Watters, E. R., & Martin, G. (2021). Health outcomes following childhood maltreatment: an examination of the biopsychosocial model. Journal of aging and health, 33(7-8), 596-606.
World Health Organization. (2022). Constitution of WHO: principles. https://www.who.int/about/governance/constitution

Published by
Write my essay
View all posts